Introduction to Java Programming (4th Edition)

Introduction to Java Programming (4th Edition)

$88.00 $88.00

  • Release Date: 21 November, 2002
  • Collectible Price: $65.99
  • Used Price: $61.00
  • Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours
  • Third Party Used Price: $66.00

Author: Y. Daniel Liang

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Customer Rating: 2.56 of 5 (18 total reviews)

  • 2 starsa wishy-washy effort

    Things I dislike about this book:
    Cheap layout. Looks like it was desktop published by a so-so amateur. Black and light blue...how very 80's textbook.

    It's Virtually useless for the cetification exam (SCJP)...get Kathy Sierra instead. It's weak on threads and inner classes apparently don't exist. The explanations are not suited toward the beginner as they gloss or assume prior knowledge of many aspects of the language.

    Coded examples tend to be too hard for the beginner as they contain multiple concepts, which can confuse some.

    Things I like about this book:
    Coded Answers to ever other question.
    Some coded examples.

    In summary I wonder what the target audience is of this book. The beginner -> then it fails, the intermediate? With no inner classes and a weak treatment of threads...I think not...then who...certainly not the advanced Java programmer.

    I think you'd do better to pocket the hefty price of this booka nd spent it on something more apt (Java 2 primer plus isn't too bad, or Head FIrst Java for the novice Or Walter Savitch if you need a textbook).

    No, this book is just too expensive and too weak for what you pay. Even Deitel is significantly better. Look elsewhere.

  • 4 starsBasically A Good Book

    Overall, this is a good book. I've
    gone through much of chapters 1-4, some of 5-6, and
    a little of chapters 17 and 19.
    Chapters 1-4 are solid and (I think)
    about at the right level for the intended
    audience. Some of the examples in Chapter 5
    (which focuses on arrays) are a little heavy.
    Learning Java arrays is difficult enough
    without adding concepts such as mean and
    standard deviation into the mix. Also, the
    two-dimensional array examples are probably
    beyond the grasp of most beginning students.

    Overall though, I'd give the book a thumbs up,
    so far. It doesn't make the mistakes that other
    Java books make, such as introducing GUI or Object
    Oriented concepts before teaching methods, loops,
    and arrays. For example, I've had a chance
    to look at the "Head First Java" book. I think
    it makes the mistake of introducing Object Oriented
    programming too early on. If you don't understand
    loops or methods, etc., then you can't work with
    Java objects. Further, the "Head First Java" book
    also goes out of its way to be funny. While I think
    there's certainly room for humor in teaching,
    most people don't set out to learn Java for the fun of it.
    They need to in order to earn a living.
    So, as dull as this book is, I'd recommend it so far.

  • 5 starsExcellent text book

    I've reviewed many of the Java textbooks on the market and have compared their coverage with the objectives of the Sun Programmer certification. I have yet to find another book that covers as much material in a well-explained manner. It does assume that you have programming experience. This is definitely not your Idiot's gude / for Dummies level of book. The book contains many, detailed examples which demonstrate effective use of code. If you want a reference book look to the O'Reilly series, if you want at textbook get Liang.