Thinking in Java (3rd Edition)

Thinking in Java (3rd Edition)

$49.99 $33.99

  • Release Date: 06 December, 2002
  • Collectible Price: $49.99
  • Used Price: $22.95
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  • Third Party Used Price: $30.00

Author: Bruce Eckel

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Customer Rating: 4.19 of 5 (266 total reviews)

  • 4 starsGreat Start for OOP

    If you have some procedural programming experience already then this book will be great for you to switch to the world of OOP. If not, then take it slow, but it can still work. I took an OOP course featuring C++ and got lost quickly, but in just a few chapters of Bruce Eckels' book, he helped me to understand what I had missed. The book starts out with a great foundation of explaining what objects are, then tells us that Everything is and object, and explains why. It explained these concepts in simple terms. The book then pays a little respect to program flow. For those who already have had programming experience, this is a quick read. Then it is back to the OOP ideas and then on into some more advanced Java topics. Excellent grouping and interesting section titles keep it a relatively light read. It covers the Java language, not just applets. That was refreshing.

  • 5 starsStill the Best

    I love and have bought this book for all the reasons I loved (and bought) the first two editions, and I appreciate the expanded coverage and extra refinement of the new one.

    I won't repeat at length what I said about the first two editions, but I will simply say that this book's title is very appropriate. It isn't just about how to do this or that in Java, but about a new philosophy of OOP as a form of communication. This way of thinking of things leads to methodologies--such as the Design Patterns movement--that are far more successful at dealing with complex and dynamic systems than the more simplistic and direct approaches taken by most previous languages and methodologies.

    I won't say that Thinking In Java is quick and easy reading or that most readers will get everything the first time through. I've followed the three editions through, exercises and all, a total of five times now, and I was still learning new stuff the last time through. This is no fault of the book. Learning Java is like learning chess. The rules may be relatively simple, but the implications of those rules are very rich in interesting possibilities, and also potentially very complex. It is to the credit of this book that it provides an intellectual path to this infinite universe of power and complexity for non-genius workaday programmers such as myself.

    Some other posters have complained that it takes too long to learn how to do some particular concrete task, or there isn't enough sample code to cut and paste into their projects, or that there aren't enough pretty pictures to guide them through how to do stuff. Thinking In Java is not a cookbook. It will do nothing to help the drag-and-drop scripting crowd that approaches the craft of programming as an exercise in cobbling together ready-made bits of code without bothering to understand how anything they are using actually works. It is doubtful that such people will ever understand and appreciate this book or the Java language itself, for that matter. I would suggest they they stick with Visual Basic until they have the time to devote to learning Object Oriented Programming, which VB is not.

  • 5 starsThe Best technical reference I own

    I'm a software engineer and I obviously read and studied various books on diffirent programming languages. My biggest claim to fame is C Programming, but I thought about object orientation for a long time and that's how I came across "Thinking in Java".

    I Downloaded the book and even printed it and eventually bought a proper copy, because I was convinced it should be on my bookshelf. After reading the firts couple of chapters I have to admit that for the first time I really do understand object orientation through the clear and concise explanation backed up by good examples given on the subject.

    Any one interested in Java should defenately own this.