Java: An Introduction to Computer Science and Programming, Third Edition

Java: An Introduction to Computer Science and Programming, Third Edition

$88.00 $79.20

  • Release Date: 07 April, 2003
  • Used Price: $36.99
  • Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours
  • Third Party Used Price: $69.00

Author: Walter Savitch

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Customer Rating: 4.24 of 5 (46 total reviews)

  • 5 starsThe way is should be

    This book is an example of how such a book should be written. It is nothing short of perfect for what it seeks to be: an introductory book in programming java. It assumes you know very little and leads from there through each topic in a manner that is clear, concise, intelligent, and determined. This book wants you to get the points it is trying to make, not dazzle you with cleverness (simpliity is the hallmark of genuis, not convoluted verbage that most writers in this field seem to wallow in: note to editors...stop the self indulgence of these useless hacks!). Mr Savitch is an excellent writer and obviously an educator of some skill. Personally it reads like he is talking to you personally and explaining each point to you in a pleasant, helpful manner.

    This books has 'loads' of examples and programs and provides code segment for points so you don't have to keep switching back or if you do, it gives you the exact location of the code so you don't have to hunt for it. No, this is awell conceived and thoroughly well realized book for the beginning Java programmer. Thoroughly recommended and thumbs up! This is the book to buy if you want to start learning Java, well, facts and effectively. mr Savitch must be justifiably proud to have given us such a work. Buy it, read it, learn from it and nod you head at the end and say to yourself...'that was money well spent'...

  • 5 starsMaybe the Best Introduction to Computer Programming

    If you have never programmed before this is the book for you. Java is probably the easiest Object-Oriented language to learn and this is the easiest book to learn Java from. The writing is concise and unbelievably clear; and 8 year-old could learn Java from Savitch. Pick up this book and download JDK from Sun for free and you'll be programming in no time.

    Example: One of the most annoying things (at least at first) about Java is its I/O System. And obviously to run the simplest program you need user input. However Savitch solves this issue by having a class, SavitchIn, that handles user input pretty well. Thus beginners can jump right in and start programming without having to worry about parsing command line arguments or using StringTokenizer.

    All this having been said, this book is far from comprehensive and you'll soon outgrow it. But as a computer science grad student, I can say that undergraduates with no previous programming experience love Savitch's book, and you will too. You might also want to pick up "Java in a Nutshell," the best Java reference book -- for the money.

  • 4 starsLiked it - But did not adopt it because of 'SavitchIn'

    I really liked the book. Savitch explains how to program in plain english - and he is easy to read. The only fault in the book (and the reason I did not adopt it in my Java courses is that he used 'SavitchIn'( a nice class he made for user input ) instead of what the student needs to learn.
    Again - this is a REALLY GOOD JAVA BOOK. But he really needs to lose the 'SavitchIn' class. (Well, at least use it as an ALTERNATE way to get user input.) What a shame. And I really like his chapters on Swing.