Enterprise Messaging Using JMS and IBM WebSphere

Enterprise Messaging Using JMS and IBM WebSphere

$49.99 $33.99

  • Release Date: 25 February, 2004
  • Used Price: $32.00
  • Availability: Usually ships in 24 hours
  • Third Party Used Price: $39.81

Author: Kareem Yusuf

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Customer Rating: 4 of 5 (1 total reviews)

  • 4 starsFully supports the latest JMS versions

    Java Messaging System arises out of the need to have loosely coupled objects associated in a J2EE architecture be able to communicate asynchronously with each other. In part because these objects might be physically quite distant from each other, like an application client and a web container that are both on the Internet. The objects may have variable loads and so the buffering of messages is preferable if any object is too busy to attend to an incoming message. Plus, objects may have intermittent connectivity to the net. Especially if mobile/nomadic computing takes off.

    In any of these scenarios, IBM sees a need for a web server, mediating between applications and a large database (DB2 in IBM's case). That server or container is WebSphere. The bulk of the book therefore deals with how WebSphere implements JMS. The book makes explicitly clear that IBM's implementation fully satisfies the JMS versions 1.02b and 1.1 APIs. Which means that a third party client application that can handle these versions can send and receive messages to WebSphere via JMS. You can consider this as an extra enabling inducement for independent software vendors to write code that hooks to WebSphere.

    Various examples are given; the book terms these JMS scenarios. Most importantly is how to use Enterprise Java Beans to swap messages via JMS. For commercial applications, another example shows the ability to encrypt the messages.

    Now hopefully, ISVs will partake of the book's offerings.