Developing Enterprise Java Applications with J2EE and UML

Developing Enterprise Java Applications with J2EE and UML

$44.99 $37.79

  • Release Date: 15 December, 2001
  • Used Price: $21.50
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Authors: Khawar Zaman Ahmed, Cary E. Umrysh

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Customer Rating: 4.5 of 5 (6 total reviews)

  • 4 starsGood overview of UML -Java mapping

    This book has a good chapter 4 on UML-Java mapping which is explained very clearly. Other books tends to be bombastic and theorectical and vomitting out dry, useless high level UML jargons. Since most developers knows attrbutes and methods better than say, trying to figure out what an association link is, the mentioned chapter is invaluable. I wish the authors expanded more on UML-Java mapping as developer can then relate a diagram to the Java code. I would have given the book 5 star if it had expanded a bit on modelling XML and UML-Java mapping.

  • 5 starsNot for code junkies

    This is a book I have been waiting for, a book explaining the relationship between J2EE and UML in practical terms. Whilst the information is not in depth, it is at the right level to explain the concepts clearly, and it gives practical examples. You won't find pages and pages of Java code. But you'll find a case study built up during the first 15 chapters, and nicely summarised in the final chapter.

    After a few introductory chapters, 5 chapters are devoted to explaining UML. Already familiar with UML, I skimmed through this, but still picked up good information. Particularly useful background was chapter 6, "Architecture".

    The more technical chapters, 9 to 15, explain the J2EE technology in the contect of UML. I found this well explained with just enough information, with no pages "wasted" on code listings. But some Java is present, showing how UML would map to code. The different components of J2EE each has a chapter devoted to them, and the relationships between them are discussed.

    All of the above is discussed in the context of RUP (Rational Unified Process), and the case study follows that process as well. The references to Conallen's WAE and the SUN standards are also very useful.

    The authors should be congratulated on writing a very clear, well-edited well-organised book.

  • 5 starsExcellent Book - Great Work!

    Grady Booch wrote the foreward to this book where he speaks
    highly of these two authors, and I'd have to agree with his
    positive assessment. I don't often give out top ratings, but in
    this case I was fairly impressed.

    The book addresses these two key technologies and describes in
    very practical terms how to really use the UML to help create
    successful J2EE-based enterprise apps. Even though most of the
    chapters go into significant depth and detail, the book is still
    very readable by a wide audience. I think someone who is
    relatively new to either of these technologies would gain lots
    from this book, and even near-gurus should be able to find many
    useful items here.

    The book covers UML modeling of Java servlets, JSP, and all
    current types of EJBs using the latest standards and extensions,
    including JSR-26 and WAE. Early chapters go through the UML
    mapping for standard Java language constructs, and suggest a
    streamlined version of RUP used to develop the case study during
    the rest of the book. Different approaches used by popular UML
    modeling tools are shown, along with some ideas on future
    directions.

    I was impressed by the technology coverage for the different
    J2EE components. Through a close examination of the architecture
    and the different mechanisms at play, the reader learns a
    significant amount about how J2EE components such as EJBs work,
    how they're intended to be used, when they make sense to use,
    and when they don't. There's also discussions on performance,
    and some of the newer features in J2EE 1.3. Both J2EE 1.2 and
    the new J2EE 1.3 are covered, which amazed me given the amount
    of lead time a book like this needs to be published!

    Downloadable code for the case study is available from the
    publisher's site. The study is fairly compact, smaller than
    Sun's pet store example, but I found this enabled me to have an
    easier time following the code. What impressed me here is there
    is complete working code for both J2EE 1.3 and 1.2, and the
    example uses true container managed entity beans. Even Sun's pet
    store never seemed to get these EJBs working right.

    If a second edition of this book was to be written, I'd like to
    see discussions on more advanced patterns using combinations of
    J2EE components, additional performance enhancing techniques,
    and a larger case study using some of these advanced patterns.

    Overall, this was an excellent buy for me.