J2EE Connector Architecture and Enterprise Application Integration

J2EE Connector Architecture and Enterprise Application Integration

$39.99 $33.19

  • Release Date: 14 December, 2001
  • Collectible Price: $29.65
  • Used Price: $9.69
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Authors: Rahul Sharma, Beth Stearns, Tony Ng

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Customer Rating: 3.4 of 5 (5 total reviews)

  • 4 starsGood book

    This book gives a good in-depth look at J2EE Connectors JCA and its use for enterprise application integration. Though J2EE and Connector architecture have evolved, this book still gives a good overview and background. Examples are not complete but have been explained well. Book assumes that reader is familiar with other parts of J2EE and that could have been better. Overall, I found the book useful while writing a connector for my project. So giving it four stars.

  • 1 starsMay as well just read the spec

    Much of this seems to be lifted from the spec. No examples to speak of. I haven't seen Apte's book. I hope it is better.

  • 2 starsPoor writing on interesting topic

    First of all, let me asure you, that I really like the Connector Architecture - there's nothing wrong with the topic. But this book is not good at explaing it. Seems like the authors/editors did a very bad job on coordinating their work. Often I just don't get it - and no - it's not because I'm a dummy. I have been working with J2EE for several years now, as well as instructing courses for BEA and for the IT University of Copenhagen in the use of J2EE.

    When reading this book you never get the feeling, that you've fully understood a topic - probably cause they've only told you half of the story. I read the whole book - because JCA is an important addition to J2EE - and because I kept hoping that the writing style would get better in the next chapter, but no.

    My suggestion is: either read the specification OR wait for another book. I wouldn't recommend this book to ANYONE - even if you could get it for free. I sure do wonder why other people like this book...?? Are we really talking about the same bunch of paper?