Mastering BEA WebLogic Server: Best Practices for Building and Deploying J2EE Applications

Mastering BEA WebLogic Server: Best Practices for Building and Deploying J2EE Applications

$50.00 $34.00

  • Release Date: 18 August, 2003
  • Collectible Price: $50.00
  • Used Price: $29.58
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Authors: Gregory Nyberg, Robert Patrick, Paul Bauerschmidt, Jeff McDaniel, Raja Mukherjee, Gregory Nyberg, Robert Patrick

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Customer Rating: 4.31 of 5 (13 total reviews)

  • 5 starsMarvelous WebLogic reference, thorough coverage

    This is the best WebLogic book I have read till now. Author clearly states that this is not a beginners' reference, and I liked the book mainly because it is not; this book gets right into the meaty stuff without wasting pages and time on covering stuff that's splattered all over the internet in numerous free tutorials.

    This book covers WebLogic 8.1, touches upon features specific to WebLogic (not plain old J2EE stuff) and the coverage is pretty deep. For example, coverage of weblogic-tags taglib for JSP development, or the 'APP-INF' magic folder introduced in WL8.1 for application level libraries (oh, this was like a sore thumb in the previous WL releases and still is in J2EE spec) gives insight into advantages one gets using WebLogic over other J2EE platforms (much better than other books wasting pages and time on advantage of using 'a' J2EE platform).

    One of the features I loved about this book is the interspersed 'Best Practice' guides, you know reading a best practice guide by itself (like Floyd Marinesku's EJB Design Pattern) can sometimes get boring, here the best practices are put in perspective by discussing them in the right context, juxtaposing them with the problem these best practices address, along with code snippets and all, great job!

    The discussion on WebLogic clusters is the best I have seen till now and the config/architecture suggestions for development and production environments are very useful.

  • 5 starsExcellent Book on WLS

    I have had the opportunity to work with the main author Greg Nyberg, on a Weblogic/J2EE based order entry system. I can verify that he is highly regarded and brings a wealth of knowledge to a project. Through "Master BEA Weblogic Server" some of that knowledge and experience is shared with the rest of us. This book is an excellent source of information for anyone who interacts with Weblogic and wants to know the how and the why of this application server. This book should prove very valuable to a few different groups of professionals. Network and Weblogic Administrators, J2EE developers deploying to Weblogic, and anyone investigating J2EE application servers will all find this book useful. I read this book cover to cover. It's not as dry as some of the O'Reilly books and provides useful diagrams when words won't suffice. It doesn't feel rushed and is free of the obvious typos that plague so many technical books today.
    Highly recommended. Buy it, read it and keep it close at hand.

  • 5 starsFollowup.

    I've already reviewed this book previously but had to comment on the reviews by the "reader from Danbury, CT".

    I'm not sure what your problem is but I don't see the value in panning a book you either didn't read or understand. My only other guess is that you have some sort of other agenda.

    I guess it is just common sense to ignore anonymous reviews.