Developing Java Enterprise Applications, 2nd Edition

Developing Java Enterprise Applications, 2nd Edition

$59.99 $59.99

  • Release Date: 18 May, 2001
  • Used Price: $39.44
  • Availability: Usually ships in 13 to 14 days

Authors: Stephen Asbury, Scott R. Weiner, Stephen Asbury, Scott R. Weiner

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Customer Rating: 3.56 of 5 (16 total reviews)

  • 5 starsGood book to get started with Enterprise Java

    It covers the most important Java APIs that the enterprise developer who uses Java.

    The books covers JDBC, RMI, JNDI, JTS, JMS, JSP, EJB, and a few other technologies. The book tends to alternate between explanatory and example chapters. So first, JDBC is discussed and then the next chapter walks through an example.

    Given the number of topics in this book, each topic is not covered in full detail as most of the topics are worthy of a book all their own (and many of them already have one). However, this book's goal is to cover just enough so you can understand the technology and get started using its core features.

    Therefore, this makes the book excellent for trying to figure what these technologies do. In fact, this book is readable by managers as well as developers, if the managers skip the example chapters.

    From reading this book, you get the impression that the authors have quite a bit of experience, have used the technologies discussed, and know what they are talking about. On the whole, this is a great book for getting your feet wet with Enterprise Java.

  • 5 starsExcellent overview of key Enterprise Java Technologies

    This book provides an excellent overview of the core Enterprise Java technologies for building 3 & N-tier application servers. Though it does not go into too much depth, it did provide enough information (sample code sniplets) and understanding of how each of these technologies play within a distributed OO application service - JMS, JTS, EJB, JavaServerPages, Servlets, and JDBC.

    Each chapter provides useful information about the technology and its role in an enterprise application.

    Although there are many sources that will provide you with the same kinds of information on JMS, JTS, EJB, ... this book is a very nice single source reference for all these technologies.

    If you are new to Enterprise Java or simply need an overview of how all these technologies play together in a distributed intra/internet application server - this is a good book to start with.

  • 3 starsWritten by Java dilettantes

    May be it's personal but I believe that those who are not geeks of their professions - shouldn't
    teach others as well. If you're not fascinated by the topic you talk about - how do you expect
    to write a good book ?! I think that this book was written by someone who learned Enterprise Java
    just to pay his rent. Writing a book seemed just another possible income ..

    Why do I think so ?

    Well, topics are explained on the very primitive level and I can actually "smell" that authors
    just don't know the material good enough to dig in - they repeat the same basic ideas many times
    but leave lot's of questions unanswered (like "Why do some methods in this table return a variable
    of a primitive type and others their object wrappers ? Is it just typo or something else ?"),
    their code examples take pages but contain only couple of useful (and, again, trivial) lines and ..
    typos everywhere (make up your mind already - is it "javax.naming" or "java.naming" ?).

    Whatever I look at - I see Java dilettantes, not Java geeks and not even Java professionals
    (excuse me, but one who compares two Strings for equality using compareTo() instead of equals()
    doesn't have a clue about Java for me !).

    I think it is still useful for getting the idea about major J2EE technologies (JDBC, JNDI, servlets,
    JSP, RMI, EJB, JMS and JTA) but *on the very basic level*. That's what I keep it for.

    P.S.
    The title should be changed to "Developing Java Enterprise Applications *for dummies*" because
    authors DO treat their readers like a 14-year old kiddies - "type and press ENTER".
    Folks, who do you think you're talking to in this book that you need to remind me about pressing ENTER ?