Java Cookbook

Java Cookbook

$44.95 $30.57

  • Release Date: 15 January, 2001
  • Used Price: $17.99
  • Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours
  • Third Party Used Price: $19.00

Author: Ian F. Darwin

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Customer Rating: 4.5 of 5 (24 total reviews)

  • 5 starsPractical Examples Beyond Basics

    OK, you've learned the basics. You know 'public static void main string args' from a hole in th ground. What now? I teach Java at a college. Only a small percentage of my students are CS majors. Most introductory java books lack good practical problems to solve. The Java Cookbook is a list of common problems and code examples on how to solve them. I learned more in two days with this book than I did with several very good java books because I need to see examples and how things work in context. If you're like that too, you'll love this book. I pack it with my laptop so I'm never without it when I need it -- it's that useful to me!

  • 4 starsKeeps up the style of the first edition

    [A review of the SECOND EDITION, 2004]

    The salient feature that distinguishes this second edition from its predecessor is the coverage of Java 1.5. The overall format of the book is unchanged. There are over 100 "hacks" that address common problems a Java programmer might face.

    The grouping of hacks into chapters is quite logical. But you are expected to already know the basics of Java programming. This book is not meant to teach that, but to help fill in gaps in your overall knowledge framework. The solutions are typically easy to understand. That is the tenor of the book. You can quickly see if a solution fits your needs and then easily apply it.

    The 1.5 features are sprinkled throughout the chapters. Because the numerous changes from 1.4 are distributed over many aspects of the language. So Darwin correctly chose not to aggregate these into one location. Which also means that this book is not the place to learn specifically about 1.5 as a whole. (Try "Java 1.5 Tiger" by McLaughlin and Flanagan.)

  • 5 starsGood to see how others would do something...

    I'm very into a method of programming called "R&D"... that stands for "Rob And Duplicate". I'd rather not invent or reinvent something if I can "borrow" someone else's solution. Given that as my mindset, I LOVE this book!

    While the hardcore reference books are necessary, all too often the beleaguered developer is left asking for a simple example of how something works in a real program. Sometimes it's nice just to be able to see a class (like the Java I/O classes) used in the context of a complete solution. From there, you can figure out how to start using the class in your own program. That's the real value of this book. I may conceptually understand what a class does, but it's sometimes hard to translate that knowledge into syntactically correct code. Seeing an example helps me get a grasp of how it is really used.

    For Notes/Domino 5 developers, this is an extremely useful book. Many Notes/Domino developers are used to using and sharing solutions that have already been coded and solved by others. This book will feel very natural to them. It allows you to get a core set of code working, and then from there you can expand to work into a complete coding solution.

    Conclusion
    Regardless of where you are at in your Java career, you should have this book. If you're a Java newbie, it will help you bridge the gap between reference manuals and real programs. If you're an experienced Java programmer, it will give you different perspectives on how a problem could be solved.