Java Extreme Programming Cookbook

Java Extreme Programming Cookbook

$34.95 $24.47

  • Release Date: 01 March, 2003
  • Used Price: $19.99
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Authors: Eric M. Burke, Brian M. Coyner

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Customer Rating: 4.45 of 5 (11 total reviews)

  • 3 starsgood information, but poorly organized

    Java Extreme Programming Cookbook consists of a bunch of "recipes" for helping you to build and test Java programs through XP. Each recipe consists of a Problem, Solution, Discussion and a "See Also" pointer to where you can find more information about the topic. The recipes cover the following opensource technologies: Ant, JUnit, HTTPUnit, Mock Objects, Cactus, JUnitPerf and XDoclet.

    Want define a classpath using Ant? Check out recipe 3.7. Wanna test a form in your web application? look at recipe 5.9. This book gives a bunch of good strategies to commonly encountered problems, but it's by no means a complete reference to the different technologies. But it will definitely get you started, and you'll be able to apply these different recipes to your own development environment.

    The organization of the recipes and consistency between the chapters is where this book lost points in its rating. Want to know how to run JUnit with Ant? look in the Ant chapter. Want to know how to run HTTPUnit with Ant? Look in the HTTPUnit chapter. The Cactus chapter has a nice recipe about "When not to use Cactus" and the JUnitPerf chapter has a nice recipe about "When to use JUnitPerf" it would have been VERY helpful to have such sections for EACH technology discussed in the book, but alas the book is inconsistent.

    Overall, I think this is a good book to jump-start you into an XP development environment using open source technologies.

  • 5 starsGreat guide to extreme programming tools

    The Java Extreme Programming Cookbook by Eric Burke and Brian Coyner features more than 100 recipes for using extreme programming tools. The tools covered are the build tool Ant, various testing tools, like JUnit, HttpUnit, Cactus and JunitPerf, and XDoclet. Included is also a chapter about deploying projects to Tomcat and JBoss.
    As always with O'Reilly cookbooks the recipies you will find in this book are of great quality and go straight to the point. Even if you already are an extreme programming devotee (and who isn't ;-) you will find a lot of interesting tips.
    Especially interesting is the chapter about Cactus. You need to test server side Java code? This chapter gives you a jumpstart introduction to it. You will learn how to set up and configure Cactus and how to write Cactus tests to test session tracking, servlet filters or JSPs.
    This book offers a lot of great solutions and should not be missing in any bookshelf.

  • 4 starsGreat technology how-to, but not a cookbook

    This is an interesting work because while it does have the cookbook format it isn't really a cookbook. The book starts with an introduction to the XP methodology (which is concise and great), and then has chapters on a number of tools (Ant, JUnit, HTTPUnit, XDoclet, Tomcat, etc.). Each of these technology chapters has a number of 'recipes' which are in fact how-to segments about commonly used tasks around these technologies. Now these sections are great and I think anyone looking at these technologies should consider this book a quick and concise way to learn the fundamentals.

    That being said the book fails somewhat, and thus the four stars, because it isn't organized in the problem/solution manner of the cookbooks. Most of the chapters are about testing but these are organized around the tool and not the problem. I would have preferred a section on web development that combined information on Tomcat and Ant, and one on web testing that talked about HTTPUnit, JUnit and Ant. In that way the book addresses problem areas without relying on the reader to understand the tool that would address his problem in addition to understanding his problem at hand.

    My gripe is not so critical. The content in the book still remains very valuable and if you are looking for a concise how-to in these Java technologies you should have a look at this book.