Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE

Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE

$59.99

  • Release Date: 07 June, 2000
  • Used Price: $1.99
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Authors: Paul Perrone, Venkata S.R.K.R. Chaganti

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Customer Rating: 4.05 of 5 (38 total reviews)

  • 5 starsOne stop purchase - excellent value for your money

    This book provides a one stop read for J2EE APIs like JMS, JSP, Servlets, JNDI and RMI-IIOP. I found that the authors have spent a great deal of time in putting out well tested examples that explains nitty-gritties of J2EE specification. This book has provided me with lot of expertise for writing mission critical applications. I would highly recommend this book to any serious JAVA developer who wants to get his feet wet with juicy code.

  • 3 starsNOT THE JAVA ARCHITECTURAL REFERENCE THAT I WANTED

    The authors deserve an "A" for effort (but much lower for usefulness). They wrote 1300+ pages and tried to cover every aspect of Enterprise Java Development: every major Java API, tie-ins/comparisons to CORBA and COM/COM+, etc. In the areas where I already had a deep understanding, I never found any factual problems with what the authors were presenting. Certainly, there are books that cover individual topics (JSP, Servlets, EJB) in more depth but the sections here are respectable.

    I was disappointed because I was looking for solid direction on architecting Java Enterprise Applications. The book constantly presents what a Java API (or CORBA model, etc.) can do for you. Only in a few instances does it clearly help you weigh the strengths/weaknesses of alternative approaches to solve a problem. It regularly presents a whole series of "solutions" (i.e. Java support for x, y, z) but it fails to tell you that Solution A would be required in most J2EE development projects while Solution B would generally be used to solve a particular niche problem.

    What you are left with is an overload of information but nowhere to "store" the information in your mind (e.g. I should use this API or class to solve this type of problem). I give two sample areas below where I read the book hoping for much but feeling empty-handed when I'd read the material. Only when I later read better (and often shorter) articles on the topic later did I come to truly understand the "real" issues.

    EXAMPLE 1, SECURITY: There are three chapters covering 100 pages on security. Having read them, I felt like I knew very little more about how one could/should implement security on a J2EE project. Having read the three chapters, I still didn't know: a) what aspects of security would I typically need to implement on a J2EE web application? (hundreds of options were presented - surely some are "core" to typical projects while others might apply to very particular situations while others are available are not used in industry) b) does a typical application server supporting J2EE model provide me with all I'd need for security/authentication or would I typically need other packages/custom code to augment what is provided (in fact, I've since learned that there are definite gaps to be filled but in all mess of saying "what is available" in J2EE, the authors don't articulate the clear gaps).

    EXAMPLE 2, XML PARSING: The authors present the main models for XML parsing (SAX and DOM). They spend 30 pages diving into the details of using the two models. However, after reading them, I only get the sense that they are two alternate ways of reading XML documents. Their discussion didn't tell me: Conceptually, how does each model work? What is the fundamental difference between the two? When would I use one vs. the other? I have since read an article introduction that in three paragraphs gave me a clear conceptual picture of how the two models worked and when I'd use one vs. the other. Now I might be ready to understand what the authors wrote but, at the time, my eyes glazed over.

    In conclusion, I cannot offer a suggestion for a better book on architecting Java applications (I've certainly looked). Right now, it seems like one needs to research particular articles that will address specific aspects of the Java articles (and be prepared to spend a lot of time doing so). This book has a lot of useful Java reference information but it is not the consolidated Java architectural reference that I was hoping for.

  • 1 starsTotal Trash

    Total trash. This is one of those books where the publisher has packed in as many pages as possible to make it seem impressive. It is completely unreadable and not even useful as a reference book.