Enterprise JMS Programming

Enterprise JMS Programming

$39.99 $27.19

  • Release Date: 01 February, 2002
  • Collectible Price: $39.99
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Author: Shaun Terry

Enterprise JMS Programming can put enterprise-level development with the Java Message Service into the hands of any capable Java developer. This book successfully mixes a tutorial to the JMS API itself and a discussion of the "big picture" concepts you need to know to architect large systems that use messaging effectively.

What distinguishes this title is the clear-as-crystal perspective on what messaging is and how to implement various messaging architectures. This book is far from just a listing of JMS APIs. The author outlines basic messaging concepts, including synchronous and asynchronous processing, plus the publish/subscribe and point-to-point models of message distribution. Early working code examples show off basic message operations (like sending and receiving messages). Then it's on to a nicely packaged demo of using a message-driven bean from Enterprise JavaBeans 2.0. A notable section looks at the various available JMS message types (and when and how to use them).

The book then covers larger concepts like transactions and security in JMS and the issues that you'll need to consider when designing secure and reliable enterprise messaging systems. The author looks at ways to make sure your messaging code is as fast and reliable as it can be. (He walks the reader through scenarios in which message queues can fill up, and in one good example, shows how orders for an online store build up in the queue in one business day.) A discussion of administration tasks is followed by real advice and screen shots using BEA WebLogic Application Server 6.1, a popular choice for J2EE/JMS deployment.

Final chapters really excel at guiding the user in designing JMS applications by providing hypothetical case studies for no less than four separate scenarios. Using intranet, extranet, and high-volume Internet systems, these examples and the designs outlined here will ensure that you can correctly apply JMS to a wide variety of enterprise-class problems. A final listing of all JMS APIs rounds out this book.

Overall, Enterprise JMS Programming sets a high standard for any programming text with its stellar presentation style and clear code examples, which provide the best of theory backed up with practical advice. It's sure to be an extremely worthwhile resource for any developer facing a JMS project. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Overview and history of the Java Message Service (JMS); guidelines for choosing JMS; types of messages (including text, byte, object, and map messages); message properties explained; constructing and sending messages (illustrated with a variety of message types); receiving messages synchronously and asynchronously; publish/subscribe and point-to-point messaging basics; tutorial for message-driven beans in Enterprise JavaBeans 2.0; understanding and using JMS transactions; security concepts in JMS; tips for maximizing JMS performance (including factors that affect performance, optimized code, and benchmarking); JMS administration (illustrated with BEA WebLogic Application Server 6.1); sample case studies illustrating JMS architectures: a sample real-time financial trading system, a workflow system, a high-volume extranet application for branch offices (for loan applications), and high-volume order-taking systems (for three online e-commerce sites); and a reference listing all JMS classes and APIs.

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Customer Rating: 4.8 of 5 (5 total reviews)

  • 5 starsBest JMS book I've read

    I have used JMS for about 2.5 years before I bought this book.
    There wasn't many books writing about JMS the first time I used JMS back in 2000.
    This book has a solid coverage of JMS and give you advice in designing an enterprise application using JMS.
    You can find samples of administration tasks for JMS Product from BEA Weblogic and iPlanet Message Queue.
    The only thing that I missed is the coverage of IBM MQ, which is the messaging infrastructure that I use.

    If you want to get a good understanding on designing JMS application, don't look further, buy this book, you won't regret your investment

  • 4 starsGenerally excellent, but not consistent.

    I bought this as I needed a JMS reference that went beyond the spec and talked about design, deployment and management of JMS infrastructure. I was very impressed with everything I read until I dipped into Chapter 13 - specifically the four pages on improving client-side throughput through internal queueing. While this is an excellent idea, the example shows how to build a complicated and threading-heavy internal queue and dispatching mechanism and recommends that you use it to, er, put events onto the Swing event dispatcher's internal queue. Hmm.

    The book (commendably) sets out to give a full picture of how to design, build, deploy, secure, and manage a JMS-based messaging architecture. This means, however, that it's very noticeable when a topic is skimmed over. For example, the section on bridging two different vendors' JMS implementations has two pages of simple code and less than one page of discussion that fails to consider administration, security, or performance, despite the normally good coverage of these areas elsewhere.

    Nevertheless, I was mostly impressed with this book - it's just a pity that the high standards it sets itself aren't met consistently throughout the book. A second edition that discussed the example architectures in Part III in detail would be a truly excellent book, and would be relevant to all messaging products rather than just JMS.

  • 5 starsA great JMS book!

    This book gave me real world examples, concepts and gotchas related to JMS. I found it very useful for understanding how to implement JMS with my J2EE application. It explained JMS in a fluid style that was easy to read.

    This book goes beyond theory and explains how to use JMS in different situations.