Java Network Programming, 2nd Edition

Java Network Programming, 2nd Edition

$39.95 $27.97

  • Release Date: 01 August, 2000
  • Used Price: $8.00
  • Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours
  • Third Party Used Price: $14.70

Author: Elliotte Rusty Harold

Does this sound familiar? You know Java well enough to write standalone applets and applications, even multithreaded ones, but you know next to nothing about the language's networking capabilities. And guess what--your next job is to write a network-centric Java program. Java Network Programming serves as an excellent introduction to network communications generally and in Java. The book opens with information on network architectures and protocols and the security restrictions placed on applets. Quickly, the author gets to the meat of networked Java with a complete elucidation of the InetAddress class, the URL-related classes, applet-specific networking methods, and sockets. The author also covers packets, Remote Method Invocation (RMI), and servlets.

The one serious shortcoming of this book is that it does not include a companion disk, which is the case with most O'Reilly books. You'll have to visit the publisher's FTP site for the code if you dislike typing the examples manually. On the whole, though, this is an excellent tutorial that will guide you through the world of Java networking as smoothly as possible.

Similar Products

Java Threads, Second Edition

From $24.47:

Java Threads, Second Edition

Java I/O (O'Reilly Java)

From $27.97:

Java I/O (O'Reilly Java)

Java RMI

From $27.97:

Java RMI

TCP/IP Sockets in Java: Practical Guide for Programmers

From $15.95:

TCP/IP Sockets in Java: Practical Guide for Programmers

Enterprise JavaBeans (3rd Edition)

From $31.47:

Enterprise JavaBeans (3rd Edition)

Customer Rating: 3.73 of 5 (30 total reviews)

  • 5 starsUp to date, complete and thorough

    This book covers all the important things to know about network programming in JDK1.3 and Java2. The content and quality is how you expect it from O'Reilly books: thorough, complete, practical with clear examples, and with a good theoretic foundation.

    The first three chapters provide theory about basic network and web concept and explains what you can do with Java networking. A lo of very interesting things, and that motivated me to read further. Chapter 4 and 5 are about Java I/O and threads and might be redundant for Java programmers, who already know basic Java stuff. But those chapters are necessary to understand the examples in all the following chapters. Chapter 6-19 deal with all the various networking topics and Java classes that deal with URL's, Internet addresses, sockets and datagrams, protocol and content handlers, RMI and JavaMail. The organization of these last chapters is topical; in most of the times you can understand a chapter without reading the previous ones, just pick out the one that you are interested in. (Interesting chapter about parsing HTML with JEditorPane, Swing has some unexpected applications!)

    I think the author gave a complete and thorough coverage of all the necessary topics. The author does not stray from its topics, is sometimes a bit dry in his explanations, and gives some important side information, e.g. about security aspects of the different Java versions in regards to RMI.

    Take in mind that this is the second edition from August 2000, updated to Java2, with some 200 or more extra pages, and we can use this book for the next couple of years.

  • 3 starsNetwork Programming Book with Few Network Topics...

    Java Network Programming is a great topic and very challenging to write about. In the past decade, Client Server and Networking where the most popular topics in the industry.

    Initially, Java was not an Internet/Web language oriented. Later versions, the language migrated into a more network oriented and became the language of choice among financial institutions, and others, because of its high productivity capabilities (mainly, shorter development curve.)

    Here are a few points that I'd like to make concerning this book:

    1.The authors took on themselves a very large assignment, rather than reducing the scope of the book, so they could deal efficiently with the content and represent it in more technical details and depth, just as O'Reilly publication does so often. The variety of topics discussed in the book could be topics for books themselves, such as Web Concepts, Threads, Java I/O...

    2.A few topics are not directly affiliated with Networking, such as Threads, Java Mail API, etc. I was surprised to find the "HTML in Swing" chapter, which is a total shift from the Networking Layer to the Presentation Layer.

    3.The book is missing important and advanced topics in Networking, such as IIOP, Distributed Objects, EJB and maybe CORBA. I was surprised to find a chapter about RMI - an old form of distributed objects, which was replaced by IIOP and EJB in recent years. RMI was combined with IIOP (RMI/IIOP) because its poor performance. Why would anyone want to study an old topic?

    4.This book is lacking of a conceptual discussion about Networking Layers in general, to help users understand why with Java, Network Programming could be a piece of cake... Conceptually speaking, indeed, with Java it's a much easier task.

    5.The bright spot here are the samples that are almost in a "copy and paste" condition. They are easy to understand and implement.

  • 4 starsAn Excellent Choice

    I read this book and really enjoyed it. It is easy to read, and has lots of useful code. I like all books written by this author. If you like this book, then you should try his book on JAVA and XML. That book is well written. I would recommend this networking book to anyone who wants to learn JAVA and Networking. Some LAN experience or a networking course will help you. Buy this book -- it is worth an investment!!!