Professional Java E-Commerce

Professional Java E-Commerce

$59.99 $59.99

  • Release Date: February, 2001
  • Used Price: $6.96
  • Availability: Out of Print--Limited Availability
  • Third Party Used Price: $9.66

Authors: Subrahmanyam Allamaraju, Ronald Ashri, Chad Darby, Robert Flenner, Alex Linde, Tracie Karsjens, Mark Kerzner, Alex Krotov, Jim MacIntosh, James McGovern

Ideal for IT managers and developers working on e-commerce projects, Professional Java E-Commerce shows off how to design and program working e-stores and other enterprise Web applications powered by Java. This book is a guide to the nuts and bolts of Java used for e-commerce sites, and it also surveys the management and design issues that any organization will face when doing business online.

The first sections give an IT manager's perspective on integrating e-commerce initiatives into your organization, whether they're B2B, B2C, or m-commerce initiatives. The coverage achieves considerable depth. As well as terms you've already heard about, the team authors also look at B2B2C and C2B2C scenarios. They cover project planning for successful e-commerce software development and today's n-tiered architectures for scalability, and provide a quite thorough discussion of the security issues surrounding e-commerce.

The book then delves into actual sample source code for a variety of e-commerce applications, beginning with a traditional online store (for selling computers) with a product catalog and a shopping basket. Written with simple JSP, this site gets enhanced later using state-of-the-art Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) for better scalability and performance. Hands-on advice for using tools like BEA WebLogic Application Server (something of an industry standard) will help you apply your knowledge to real projects. Further examples look at real-world instances of corporate e-commerce in action, including working code for a portal Web site, a supply chain application (using XML), and a workflow Web application. The book closes with newer technologies like m-commerce (in which business is conducted through wireless devices) and smart cards.

The working source code and real-world perspective help distinguish this text in its presentation of some emerging Java enterprise-level technologies. For many working Java developers or managers, Professional Java E-Commerce can help shift the odds in your favor for that next big e-commerce project with its mix of canny advice and very practical sample source code that shows the right ways to use Java to write several high-end enterprise e-commerce solutions. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered:

  • E-commerce business strategy and planning
  • Types and business impact of e-commerce (including B2C, B2B, B2B2C, C2C, C2B2C, and m-commerce)
  • Business requirements for e-commerce applications (including technological and business considerations)
  • E-commerce project planning (software project management and process)
  • Guide to architecting e-commerce applications (technical requirements and architecture)
  • Overview of the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and its support for e-commerce
  • Design approaches and components for e-commerce
  • Introduction to XML and XSLT
  • Security issues for online business (including Java security, authentication, and authorization)
  • Sample B2C online computer store
  • Usability issues (searching, feedback, and membership and internationalization)
  • Data validation techniques for user input (client-side and server-side options)
  • Adding Enterprise JavaBeans to the e-commerce site
  • Using BEA WebLogic
  • Case study for a custom portal
  • Case study for a B2B solution using XML/XSLT to share data between systems in the supply chain
  • Mass integration with the Java Message Service (JMS)
  • Introduction to application service providers (ASPs)
  • Case studies for a workflow application and a corporate purchasing Web site
  • Introduction to m-commerce
  • WAP and WML
  • Smart cards
  • XML and XSLT primer

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Customer Rating: 3.38 of 5 (8 total reviews)

  • 5 starsExcellent coverage

    This is the only book that covers such a wide range of issues relating to the application of Java to e-commerce. Although there are subjects that experienced users would certainly prefered to see treated in more depth this is an invaluable resource to those that need to get the big picture to a level that is practical and useful for understanding application and designing solutions. Well done.

  • 1 starsOut of date and filled with fluff

    Of all the technical books I've read this one qualifies as the worst. It's out of date, but even when it was new it would justify my opinion.

    It attempts to cover too wide an area of subjects, and manages to either state the obvious (as in the first chapters that make a sophmoric attempt to define e-commenrce), to display questionable knowledge on the part of contributing authors, as in the section that lamely attempts to discuss architecture. The section on architecture should have been written by someone who could write and who understood architecture. Unfortunately I got the impression that the authors had neither qualifications.

    The case studies were interesting, but were not sufficiently insightful to warrant buying this book that those alone.

    There are positives to this book though. It weighs nearly 6 pounds, making it suitable as a doorstop. Having photos of all of the authors who contributed on the front cover is helpful if you conduct interviews since it helps in the screen process in case one of them shows up for an interview or tries to come in as a consultant.

    My advice is to avoid this book. There are much better ones that cover the subjects in it.

  • 2 starsDisappointing

    There are a few good sections in this book (mainly the chapters that deal with WebLogic and the appendices of primers and reference material that comprise Section 6). However, considering that this book weighs in at over 1000 pages, its mainly fluff or glib (but not helpful), with too much material that states the obvious.

    Much of the fluff is found in Section 1 (The E-Commerce Landscape), and Section 2 (Architecting Java-Based E-Commerce Systems) was, in my opinion, a glossed over, high-level overview that was used as filler.

    Sections 3 (B2C E-Commerce Solutions) and 4 (B2B E-Commerce Solutions) have a few interesting chapters in each. My main complaint here is that Section 3 is a mix of solutions and techniques, while Section 4 is purely solution-focused. Section 5 (M-Commerce) is too light to be useful, and most of the material is already woefully out of date.

    My recommendation is to pass this book up and, instead, seek out single-topic books that address the subjects in which you're interested.